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Art

Having a shop has always been my dream. Three years ago, it finally came to a reality.

Thanks to my dear friend Rupert Blanchard who kindly let me use the front part of his workshop in Shoreditch. At the cozy space fitted by him, I have met many interesting customers including you all.

Now, Momosan Shop on Kingsland Road is closed and we are looking for an alternative space somewhere in the town. Meanwhile, Momosan Shop opens at two lovely spaces both East and West London.

Momosan Shop at Serpentine
Serpentine Sackler Gallery
 

It is an absolute pleasure to announce that Martino Gamper has kindly invited Momosan Shop to curate the Serpentine Shop as part of the design is a state of mind exhibition just opened at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery, one of the most prestigious art galleries in the town.

Hope you will all have a chance to visit the show while enjoying a long walk in the Hyde Park in the best season yet to come.

05 March – 21 April

Tuesday – Sunday : 10am to 6pm

momosan corner new

tokyobike

Started as a pop-up shop, it’s been more than a year since Momosan Shop nested at the most pretty-looking bike boutique in town.

Momosan Corner is now refurbished by Tiago Almeida, a great young designer-maker. I hope you all like the new look of it.

87-89 Tabernacle Street, London, EC2A 4BA

Tuesday – Friday : 11am to 7pm
Saturday – Sunday : 11am to 5pm

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Cherry Blossom in Kakunodate, Japan

Cherry Blossom in Kakunodate, Japan

So, can we finally trust that the Spring has arrived in London, too?
While we have been waiting for the warmer season, the cherry blossom in Japan has pretty much come to an end. After appreciating the bloom, it is probably a good time to introduce another way to appreciate the cherry tree.

Kabazaiku is the regional craft of making products from wild cherry tree bark in Kakunodate, Japan. Originating from the 18th century, Kaba craft was initially used for making brush handles, bows, and sheaths for swords. Passed down from masters to apprentices, the techniques are continually evolving.

The bark of the abundant cherry trees is cleaned and polished to make it smooth and uniform

The bark of the abundant cherry trees is cleaned and polished to make it smooth and uniform

The bark is cut into the desired shape, then reapplied to the core wood using the cherry sap as an adhesive

The bark is cut into the desired shape, then reapplied to the core wood using the sap as an adhesive

The application process involves using a metal trowel which is heated over a fire

The application process involves using a metal trowel which is heated over a fire

The cherry bark maintains a relatively constant moisture level, acting as a natural insulator against changes in humidity, essential in the storage of tea leaves. The distinctive dark red colour is a combination of the natural colour of the bark and the tree’s sap.

 

At Momosan Shop, you can find a range of cherry products that might be a nice addition for a new season.

A Geometrical Study by Lars Frideen / £55, available from Momosan Shop

Lars Frideen is one of the designers I asked to participate in the current exhibition “Hexagon”. I always appreciated his knowlegde and passion in wood.

The projects starts with cutting six identical pieces of wood with a hole drilled in centre of each pieces. These pieces are put together to form a cube. All sides are then cut at a 45 degree angle and all corners are then cut off at a 35 degree angle. What you are left with a form consisting of number of geometrical shapes; circle, triangle, square, hexagon, octagon and rhombus.

Wood used are reclaimed wood that Lars has collected over the years. For examples, Jarrah salvaged after decades of service off the coast in Whitstable, a log of Hinoki brought back in his suitcase from Japan or a small piece of Rosewood from Brazil found on the street in London.

Lars does not give a specific use to this beautifully crafted object but the users can give variety of purposes depending on their imaginations; an educational toy, a penholder, a candle holder, sculpture on the desk ….

Lars also made boxes for the geometric balls. From angled off-cuts, he also made hexagonal coasters. This piece reminds me of Hakone’s Yosegi-zaiku in Japan. Lovely addition to the tea-time set.

All left from this project are saw dust and wood chipping. He is planning to make paper out of them!

Wood used in the process including; Ash, Cherry, English Oak, American Oak, Hinoki, Sugi, Red Cedar, Iroko, Burmese Teak, Rosewood, Mahogany and Jarrah.