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Andrew DriftwoodBoro Collection by Andrew Driftwood
02 – 12 July

We are presenting work by a fashion brand Andrew Driftwood, a brand started by Aogu Otsuka in 2013.

Otsuka uses antique fabrics often found in England. Fabrics are dyed using traditional methods and made into clothes by Otsuka himself in his studio in Tokyo. Otsuka designs and makes pieces that are timeless and be worn as long as the fabric lasts.

For this exhibition, Otsuka made a collection using Japanese antique fabric, boro. Boro is textiles from nineteenth and early twentieth century when fabric was valuable. Once clothes were made, it would be endlessly repaired and patched throughout the owner’s lifetime, or perhaps longer. Old kimonos were sewn layer-on-layer using salvaged swatches, every scrap was reused over and over again. These textiles may have their origins in austerity and utilitarian design but the sophistication of the repeated repair, often by several successive generations, makes each piece completely unique.

With the same philosophy, Otsuka created wearable pieces, giving new lives to much cherished boro textiles. We hope many people will have a chance to see this collaborative work of Otsuka and our ancestors.

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Launch: Thursday 2nd July, 6-8 pm

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Momosan Shop 79a Wilton Way, London E8 1BG
Open Thursday – Sunday:  11:00 – 18:00

Invite

“Wright & Doyle” is a unit formed by plant lovers; a gardener (Matt Wright) and a pattern cutter (Izabella Doyle).

A few years ago, we met for the first time when the couple visited Momosan Shop in search for some objects for their new home Chinampa: a boat house that they just designed to accommodate not only themselves but their ever expanding number of house plants.

Having their backgrounds in fine art and pattern cutting, Wright & Doyle designed and handcrafted a range of products catering to those with a passion for gardening and all things green. With every consideration to their function and form, the collection includes unique garments and accessories such as plant stands with hand casted ceramic pots and hand knotted plant hangers. Everything that they have made are the things that they use and surround themselves in their daily lives.

This week, WRIGHT & DOYLE is transforming our window with their first collection with rare plants sourced by them. We are celebrating its launch this Thu, 14th May (Friday 15th May, 6-8pm). We hope you can be part of it and enjoy a drink or two with us.

WRIGHT & DOYLE – Garden Outfitters –
Launch: Thursday 14th May, 7-9 pm Due to adverse weather forecasted on 14th, the launch has moved to Friday 15th May, 6-8pm

Momosan Shop 79a Wilton Way, London E8 1BG

Momosan Shop is open following dates in March.

Momosan Shop: 79a Wilton Way, London E8 1BG

March open hours

 

Our shop-in-shop locations opens as usual.

at tokyobike:  87-89 Tabernacle Street, London, EC2A 4BA

Tue – Fri: 11am -7pm  / Sat- Sun: 11am-5pm

at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery: West Carriage Drive, Kensington Gardens, London W2 2AR

Tue – Fri: 11am -7pm  / Sat- Sun: 11am-5pm

The current exhibition shows work by Pascale Marthine Tayou.

 

 

For February, Momosan Shop is open following dates.

Momosan Shop: 79a Wilton Way, London E8 1BG

 

Feb-open-hours

Also our shop-in-shop locations opens as usual.

at tokyobike:  87-89 Tabernacle Street, London, EC2A 4BA

Tue – Fri: 11am -7pm  / Sat- Sun: 11am-5pm

at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery: West Carriage Drive, Kensington Gardens, London W2 2AR

Tue – Fri: 11am -7pm  / Sat- Sun: 11am-5pm

 

Growing Tea and Grinding Ink

Wazuka cha, Ogatsu ink-stones

Calligraphy by Ms. Mami Harada

Tuesday 10th February 5.30-8.00pm

tokyobike London

87-89 Tabernacle Street, London EC2A 4BA

“In the craft of the master tea-maker or calligrapher we see the Japanese genius for refined self-expression” Timothy Toomey

Our friend tokyobike is hosting a special evening next week.

A variety of tea, grown by a 350 years old Wazuka farm, will be served to visitors. The evening will also offer an opportunity to informally meet a small Japanese team exhibiting and demonstrating the use of contemporary su-zu-ri (ink-stones).

Regional products like tea and suzuri (ink-stones) have been highly prized inside Japan and until recently were not widely available in the West. Now, a new generation of tea farmers and craftsmen have sought to reach a global market for their products with the support of small companies such as tokyobike and the many small and specialist tea merchants that have set themselves up across England in recent years.

Wazuka Tea

Wazuka cha is known as the tea of wisdom.

Tea has been grown in Wazuka since being imported from China during the Kamakura period (1185 -1333). The mountainous nature of the terrain makes for difficulties in harvesting but contributes to a variation in temperature between night and day providing a climate which fosters quality tea growing. Tea is an evergreen plant and the seemingly endless rows of tea bushes across the slopes of Wazuka creates a lush scenery.

The area is particularly known for the production of Uji-cha, one of Japan’s finest teas marketed by merchants in nearby Uji, but actually grown in Wazuka.

Many of the tea farms in Wazuka are family-owned. Wazuka produces a variety of teas including: Sencha, Hoji-cha, Kyoban-cha, Oolong-cha, Genmai-cha and Matcha charteristic of the tea ceremony. All of the teas that you will taste are certified organic (Japan standard).

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Ogatsu Ink-stones

Ogatsu in Ishinomaki City, Miyagi Prefecture, is a town that dates back to the Muromachi era. It became known for the high quality of its suzuri (ink-stone) making and is said to have once accounted for 90% of the production of Japanese ink-stones.

While the industry prospered until the latter half of the Showa Period (1926-1989) thanks to the widespread use of ink-stones in Japanese schools, it subsequently began to decline and was later completely washed away in the Tsunami that struck the area during the Great East Japan Earthquake.

In calligraphy, ink is traditionally formed by grinding ink-sticks on a suzuri; in this process the heart is calmed, following on from which, writing can commence. This approach reveals the true spirit of calligraphy and it why it has long been revered as an art.

In modern Japan the practice of making ink has all but disappeared and nowadays in schools it is common to simply use liquid ink. With the spread of digital devices, only a simplified culture of letters remains as the writing of words by hand is declining. Thus the majority of people have never experienced grinding their own ink and an entire culture of writing with brush is as much at risk as the craft of suzuri making itself.

Today, only one craftsman is left in the area, not only is the future bleak for suzuri production, but also for the training of those who would like to succeed him.

Seven young designers working alongside Mr. Ichio Endo, the last of the Ogatsu suzuri carvers, have created new ink-stone designs, which are presented in this exhibition.

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Do not miss this special opportunity!

 
 
 
 

HAPPY NEW YEAR !

We hope you all had a great winter break.

Momosan Shop will reopen slowly this month. Opening hours for the main shop is following.

Momosan Shop: 79a Wilton Way, London E8 1BG

 

Jan-open-hours

Our shop-in-shops open as usual.

at tokyobike:  87-89 Tabernacle Street, London, EC2A 4BA

Tue – Fri: 11am -7pm  / Sat- Sun: 11am-5pm

at the Serpentine Sackler Gallery: West Carriage Drive, Kensington Gardens, London W2 2AR

Tue – Fri: 11am -7pm  / Sat- Sun: 11am-5pm